RECOVERY AWARD

The Recovery Award recognises a project that helps people or the environment recover from any fire type, not just bushfire. The project can be short or long term.

Examples of projects include but are not restricted to:
– Projects that contribute to bringing the community together
– Projects that utilise inclusive practices to help people reconnect
– Supporting/facilitating recovery conversations
– Projects to minimise impact on communities
– Memorials or recovery guides

Fire services involvement can be in a supporting role, where appropriate, but projects must be community led or initiated.

This award is open to the Community stream:
Community – this stream includes not-for-profit organisations, individuals, community groups, volunteer groups, schools or tertiary institutions.^

^DELWP, CFA, MFB, EMV and PV employees and members are NOT eligible to enter community categories. Fire services, state and local government, industry and business should apply to one of the Government and Industry categories:
· Partnership
· Diversity
· Innovation

The 2016 and 2015 Recovery Award winners are great examples for this category. For more examples of winning and finalist projects, check out Winners and Finalists in the top menu on this page.

2016 Recovery Award winners
Rural Fire Tales (Industry)

Strengthening Communities After the Scotsburn Fires (Community)

2015 Recovery Award winners
Black Hill Reserve Fire Recovery (Industry)

Landcare-led Recovery After 2014 Mickleham-Kilmore Fires (Community)

South West Goulburn Landcare Network Community Fire Recovery Initiative (Community)

 

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